— Helene Goldnadel Classes

Archive
Tag "Piano Lessons"

Private piano lessons may or may not produce a musician out of one’s child. Most parents want the very best for their children. They want them to be successful, happy, smart and talented. And why not? Being exposed to a multitude of slices of life has a good chance of producing a well-rounded kid. If they are musically inclined, having lessons may give them a spring board to bounce from. If they are not so inclined, then it will be one more piece of information to have stored in their brain’s computer files. Here are some thoughts by Helene Goldnadel a life coach, about signing a child up for private lessons:

 

  • Rented piano: It’s wise to rent an modest piano for a kid to try out before investing in the purchase of a baby grand. If others in the family already play this musical instrument, then owning a high quality instrument will be a fine choice. If an early student is just getting his or her feet wet learning the basics, it would be wiser to rent a piano initially. Many stores will give credit toward a purchase to a previous customer who leased an instrument for a certain length of time.
  • Helps with mathematics: Musicians must do a lot of counting in their head and working with musical math equations. Keyboard lessons may not only help junior learn scales and songs but also help him with his arithmetic studies.
  • Memory enhancement: Studies have shown that musicians have better memories than the average individual. Brain mapping imagery has backed up this claim.
  • Brain looks different: The brain of a seasoned musician appears different in imagery scans than that of an average person. There are actually more nerve cells and the organ itself is larger. The cerebral cortex, which is the portion used for thought processes, language skills and perceptual expertise, is more highly developed.
  • Reorganization: Since playing a musical instrument is a complex endeavor, doing so on a regular basis has been shown in studies to actually reorganize the brain. Not only is this a great thing for children learning new skills, it is also a hopeful discovery in retraining the thought processes of stroke victims or others who have suffered some sort of neurological setback.
  • Time for playing outside: Even if a son or daughter shows promising talent with tinkling the ivories, it’s important that he or she has balance in life. Playing outside, running, jumping and riding the bicycle are also important skills to provide life balance, physical strength and agility. Moderation is the key.
  • Group lessons: A lower cost alternative to private lessons are those given to a group. It won’t provide the same level of personal attention in guiding a young individual but it will be less expensive.

 

Private piano lessons can enrich a childhood in multiple ways. Memory enhancement, improved math reasoning, more highly developed gray matter, and reorganization are all possible. With balance of roller skating, playing hopscotch and jumping rope, kids can have the best of both worlds.

Read More

The piano bench, it is an unassuming little piece of furniture. It needs its bigger companion, the piano, to carry out its purpose for being. Sure, you can stack stuff on it or play cards on it or, in a pinch, eat lunch on it, but piano benches are carrying out their reason for being when they are being sat on and music is emanating from the piano. The companion of the bench is the sheet music cabinet. Most piano benches hold a small amount of music, but they quickly become overloaded and music begins to pile up on the top of the piano. A sheet music cabinet solves this problem nicely.

Violin Music

This unassuming piano bench can be either a beloved friend or an instrument of torture, particularly to the child who is given the priceless gift of piano lessons. Children react to or take to piano lessons in different ways. Some love the music and take to the practice quickly and with enthusiasm. For them, the bench is a friend. Other children, whether they love or do not care about the music, just do not like to practice. For these poor little kids, the bench is an object of torture. Sit them down on it and they will squirm and daydream and watch the clock until the practice time is over. What makes the difference between these two music students? I do not have the answer to that question, but I wish I did. Is it related to the amount of talent that the child is born with? Does it depend on the music that the teacher chooses compared to the music that the child enjoys? Does it depend on the ability of the child to sit still and keep his or her mind on the task?

 

The value of piano lessons, however, is inestimable. At the physical level, kids are able to begin picking up musical talent before they start school. Babies are able to match a pitch they hear and to reproduce a rhythm. And learning music is like learning language and learning to read. There is a cut-off point at which this learning becomes much more difficult. For piano lessons, this age is around eleven. Studies have shown that piano lessons at an early age make physical changes to the growing brain. Children who take lessons score higher on the verbal and mathematical sections of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. But benefits go beyond the physical. In later years, people who took lessons as children are open to greater musical pleasure in adulthood. One of my great pleasures is singing in the church choir. You do not have to read music to sing in the choir, but it sure helps. Also, listening to music is more pleasurable when you know something about how the music is put together.

 

While the piano is probably the best instrument for learning a lot of different aspects of music, a child who sees the bench as an instrument of torture might thrive on another instrument. Marching in the band is also a rewarding way to learn music.

 

Also read: Helene Goldnadel Discusses the Criteria to Consider to Learn Music

Read More

Recent Comments

    site by bcz