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Didaskaleinophobia is also referred as School Phobia. This phobia is characterized by a fear of going to school. Children in the age group of 8 to 13 are the ones who tend to be extremely debilitating if this condition is allowed to progress over a period of time. Various techniques can aid you in managing the school phobia. Children derive great inspiration from the professionals of psychotherapy who can in turn help the parents and the school authorities in supporting the child.

 

Various causes lead to the development of Phobia. In most of the cases, it is commonly associated with the anxiety of separation. Different kinds of stress can also evoke this phenomenon. A divorce of the parents, a loss of a loved one, suffering, learning disability constant confrontation with the bullying can develop school phobia in the child. A child may be extremely worried about his/ her performance in the school or may or may not like a particular teaching style. Helene Goldnadel says that one of the most important steps in the diagnosis and treatment of school phobia is to find out the main causes that led to the development of the school phobia.

 

The child may tend to throw numerous tantrums to avoid going to the school. He/ she may protest extravagantly or pretend to be unwell. After going to the school, the child may not attend the classes and run away or may also depict many behavioral problems in the class or on the playground. The very discussion of the school can make the child upset, angry or aggressive.

 

When parents get to know about the school phobia that the child is undergoing, they need to address it with professional help. If the school phobia is left untreated for a long period, it can interfere with the child’s success and performance in the school. The treatment involves psychotherapy sessions coupled with various adjustments to be made at home to keep the child at ease. For instance: If bullying is the cause, then this situation can be handled by addressing it in an appropriate manner. A staff member can take up the responsibility of escorting the child to the class and also provide the necessary support as and when needed. This will improve the confidence of the child as he/ she knows that there is a friendly adult who can help him/ her to come out of any difficult situation.

 

Various changes are also recommended at home. This can include supportive language from the parents, with good and warm assistance in homework. If the child is not comfortable, then parents can encourage the child to explore his/ her area of interest and achieve mastery in it. This will give the child the much-needed boost to prove oneself. Parents can sit and discuss about their fear and success stories in school to encourage them to overcome their fears. A school phobia can be dispelled with the help of structured activities at home and reading.

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As part of a child’s normal developmental stages, she or he will reach a very important stage, which is getting ready for school. This is one of the major steps a child may encounter in his or her life. This is something big for them because this is the time where they now start to face the real world and separation from parents begins. This could be a crucial part for parents and also for the child.

 

When your child reaches 3 or 4 years of age, as parents, you will most probably prepare your child for school. Getting yourselves ready for your child’s first big event is not enough. Your child needs to be prepared the most. How will you know if your child is ready? Well, this article by Helene Goldnadel a life coach may help you, as it provides three signs that your child is ready for school:

 

  1. Social aspect - You will know when your child is ready for school when there is already social readiness. Social readiness means your child can now make friends and is socially interactive. This is the time when your child can actually create his or her circle of friends. Being at school requires your child to be with groups and some company. When your child is socially ready, then she or he is now ready for school.
  2. Emotional aspect - You will know when your child is ready for school when there is already emotional readiness. Emotional readiness means that your child can now actually separate from guardians or from you. They already know how to adjust well with the separation. They no longer seek for their parent’s company and are emotionally comfortable with others. When the emotional aspect of your child is already prepared, then she or he is already ready for school.
  3. Behavioral aspect - You will know when your child is ready for school when there is behavioral readiness. Behavioral readiness means that your child is able to make his or her decisions and act it according to his or her own thinking. Your child now may be able to take control over his or her things. She or he may be able to take responsibility of his or her own toys and be able to share it with others. When she respects and considers other people, especially people in authority, then your child is ready for school.

 

You see, there are so many aspects you need to consider when preparing your child for school. As parents, you also need to be prepared. Prepared enough to let go of your child and let him or her be welcomed in the real world. Along with your readiness, you also need to take some important signs to determine if your child is already ready for school. So parents, take responsibility!

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Private piano lessons may or may not produce a musician out of one’s child. Most parents want the very best for their children. They want them to be successful, happy, smart and talented. And why not? Being exposed to a multitude of slices of life has a good chance of producing a well-rounded kid. If they are musically inclined, having lessons may give them a spring board to bounce from. If they are not so inclined, then it will be one more piece of information to have stored in their brain’s computer files. Here are some thoughts by Helene Goldnadel a life coach, about signing a child up for private lessons:

 

  • Rented piano: It’s wise to rent an modest piano for a kid to try out before investing in the purchase of a baby grand. If others in the family already play this musical instrument, then owning a high quality instrument will be a fine choice. If an early student is just getting his or her feet wet learning the basics, it would be wiser to rent a piano initially. Many stores will give credit toward a purchase to a previous customer who leased an instrument for a certain length of time.
  • Helps with mathematics: Musicians must do a lot of counting in their head and working with musical math equations. Keyboard lessons may not only help junior learn scales and songs but also help him with his arithmetic studies.
  • Memory enhancement: Studies have shown that musicians have better memories than the average individual. Brain mapping imagery has backed up this claim.
  • Brain looks different: The brain of a seasoned musician appears different in imagery scans than that of an average person. There are actually more nerve cells and the organ itself is larger. The cerebral cortex, which is the portion used for thought processes, language skills and perceptual expertise, is more highly developed.
  • Reorganization: Since playing a musical instrument is a complex endeavor, doing so on a regular basis has been shown in studies to actually reorganize the brain. Not only is this a great thing for children learning new skills, it is also a hopeful discovery in retraining the thought processes of stroke victims or others who have suffered some sort of neurological setback.
  • Time for playing outside: Even if a son or daughter shows promising talent with tinkling the ivories, it’s important that he or she has balance in life. Playing outside, running, jumping and riding the bicycle are also important skills to provide life balance, physical strength and agility. Moderation is the key.
  • Group lessons: A lower cost alternative to private lessons are those given to a group. It won’t provide the same level of personal attention in guiding a young individual but it will be less expensive.

 

Private piano lessons can enrich a childhood in multiple ways. Memory enhancement, improved math reasoning, more highly developed gray matter, and reorganization are all possible. With balance of roller skating, playing hopscotch and jumping rope, kids can have the best of both worlds.

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Play serves as important function in a child’s education and development. Play begins at birth and helps children learn about their world, express their feelings and ideas, and develop social relationships with the people they encounter throughout their life. There are two possibly three, says Helene Goldnadel that children go through as they learn through play.

 

The first is the sensorimotor or exploratory stage of infancy and is usually the first two years of life. In this stage, infants learn by experimenting with the reactions of their actions. In the beginning of this stage the infant will use the same action for all objects and objectives. As infants explore, they discover that certain actions give them the results that they desire and others do not. This is sometimes referred to as “practice play”. In this stage there is no real difference between exploration and play because infants use exploration to acquire information and play to influence the environment, both of which are important learning factors.

 

The second stage is a level of symbolic play or the stage of dramatic or pretend play that is characteristic of preschoolers and kindergarteners. Play becomes more intellectual at this stage because children start to represent their world through pretend play or role playing. Preschool and kindergarten children spend less time exploring than infants and toddlers. Gradually practice play is replaced by constructive play, in which children engage in self-regulating creation or construction of a product or problem solution. This stage of play provides children with a unique way to problem solve and challenge themselves. This stage is the peak of pretend play. Children with replica objects (miniature dolls, action figures, cars, etc.), with realistic or non-realistic normal-sized objects or without objects. Children at this stage are better at using imaginary objects than they were in the previous stage. They can also use objects to represent other objects, for example, using a stick as a sword or a block as cookie. Children at this stage are also able to perform mature role-play, which requires the ability to set up the context for play. They use what they have experienced in their own life – how adults talk to babies, talk on the phone, etc. Other children are invited to play, roles are assigned, and context is established (but may change as play progresses). Verbal role taking is possible in two registers if dolls are involved- one for the mother and one for the baby. The most typical social interaction at preschool-age level is pretend play. Pretending seems to assist unfamiliar peers by providing a means by which children can find common ground for interaction.

 

Some say there is also a third stage in which playing involves games that have rules. Some may argue play and games are two different things- that play developmentally leads to games. Games have obstacles and rules imposed by the game itself, whereas play essentially has no rules or obstacles unless they are imposed by the child and hence changeable by the child also. However, for my purpose we will just say that the next stage of development is one that involves more set rules, but can have just as much learning possibilities. This provides a way for children to problem solve within a set of rules, which is a skill they will need later in life. Although, pretend play is less evident, this is not to say that it has completely disappeared from these older children’s play, but it is much more involved and complicated. There is almost always a specific goal and verbal communication is much more important.

 

This is just a guide to help you understand the stages and progression of a child’s learning through play. Every child is different. Whatever stage a child may be in, the important thing to know is that play is important in every child’s development and should be nourished and not dismissed as something children do in their free time. Play has the biggest influence on the development (physically, mentally, and emotionally) of children of all ages.

 

Also read: The Value of Playing in a Child’s Development

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