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Child Development

Are you the parent of a child with autism or a learning disability that has been diagnosed with auditory processing disorder? Would you like to understand how this disorder affects your child’s education? Would you like to learn about some things that your child’s teacher can do in the classroom, to help your child learn? Here we will give you parenting tips suggested by Helene Goldnadel that will help your child in their classroom.

 

Auditory Processing Disorder is the inability to attend to, discriminate among, or understand auditory information. This disorder negatively affects a child’s education in many ways that will be discussed.

 

  • Make sure that your child’s teacher understands what auditory processing disorder I,s and how to work with your child. This disorder can negatively affect reading in many ways as well as other areas of academics. Your child’s teacher may require special training in this area, to be able to effectively work with your child.
  • Make sure that your child is receiving preferential seating near the person that is giving the instruction. A distance of three to four feet is best, and will allow your child to receive the most benefit not only from auditory communication but from visual as well. Ask your child’s teacher not to put them near a noise source such as bathroom, equipment etc.
  • Make sure that your child’s teacher is giving visual cues, which will make it easier for your child to understand what the teacher is saying.
  • A peer partner may be helpful in keeping your child on task and helping them to understand verbal directions and instruction.
  • Ask that your child’s teacher provide a separate work area for your child to limit distractions.
  • Ask for FM amplification to improve access to auditory information. The recommendation for this system is usually made by an audiologist, who is especially trained in this area.
  • Ask your child’s teacher to speak in a clear modulated voice to increase the chance that your child will understand what is being said.
  • Ask your child’s teacher to break down verbal directions to small steps. Also ask that the directions be repeated and perhaps used with visual cues.
  • Your child can repeat the verbal instruction or the directions to ensure that he or she understands them.
  • Children respond better to positive feedback than negative feedback or punishment. Work with your child’s teacher to put in place positive supports that will help your child.
  • Have your child’s teacher review, preview and summarize a class lesson.
  • If your child needs more time on assignments ask their teacher to allow this as a accommodation.
  • Long complicated directions could be tape recorded so that your child could listen to them several times.
  • Open classrooms are very difficult for children with auditory processing disorder. Doors and windows should be closed as much as possible to reduce or eliminate distractions.
  • Ask your child’s teacher to allow them to use special organizational materials such as organizers, notebooks to write verbal directions down, etc.

 

Also read: Don’t Let Vocal Quality Suffer During Your Rendition

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The level of kids with ADHD has risen drastically in the last several years. It is currently reported that over 5% of kids between ages 6-17 in the U.S. have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-ADHD. So, if you are a teacher or work with kids, at least one in every 25 kids in your class will have ADHD. There are some things that can be done in teaching style and classroom set up that will aid in successfully teaching this type of child.

 

The first thing you will want to do is gather information. Talk to their parents, previous teachers, read their school records, etc. to find out their typical behavior, ways they learn best, things that distract them and so on. Keep communication lines with the parents open using frequent communication in person, email, notes, and phone calls. It may be helpful to email the child’s assignments to the parents each week so that instructions will be clear.

 

As far as instructions, Helene Goldnadel suggests you to give them in short, easy-to-understand statements and have the student repeat the instruction back to you. Non-verbal clues such as raising your hand, blinking the light off and on or a quick tap with a pencil on the desk can be used to quiet students. You can use private clues for specific children, like a hand on the shoulder to show they are off task and need to refocus. Eye contact is very important when giving instructions.

 

Other methods to attain success are rewards such as stickers, charting points, smile and verbal praise. The child may find it helpful to have an organizational method, such as a checklist in order of priority, labeling their things as to what stays at school and what goes home, and have a certain routine that is followed every day so they know what comes next.

 

Other suggestions include seating the child next to the teacher to keep the child on task. Also sitting next to a child role model can help the ADHD child stay better focused. It is important to have a non-distracting classroom, especially during tests and other high focus activities. Be sure not to have them in a location that would seem to show punishment, but allows for them to focus with little distraction.

 

Some teachers find it helpful to use an egg timer to show the time available for certain activities and the child can see how much time is left for a certain project. Playing music during some class time may be a good indicator of the level of activity and noise that should be present in the class. For example, if it is a quiet, individual activity the teacher may play soft, quiet music. Also make sure that an ADHD child is comfortable in their desk space. If the furniture is too big or too small, it will make the child more likely to squirm.

 

Even though these ideas are helpful to kids with ADHD, they can be used to help any class of children. Most students do work better when following guidelines such as these listed.

 

To learn more, please visit here: http://helenegoldnadel.webs.com/

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The importance of play to youngsters should not be underestimated. Play is an essential part of growing up and researchers believe it’s critical to ensure children reach their full potential in life. Research in animals show that brain connections develop during periods of play, and there’s no reason to suppose the same is not true of young humans. Parents don’t always understand the importance of play however, and in today’s competitive world, the temptation is to stop your children “wasting time” and to put the time to what they believe is more constructive use.

 

For a child, however, there is no more constructive activity than play. When analyzing the importance of play, particularly if you’re tempted to introduce a more “worthwhile” activity such as flash cards, educational computer games or dancing lessons, you should take into account the following points discussed by Helene Goldnadel a life coach:

 

Play allows a young child to be “in charge.” Think about this – in their everyday lives, they’re small and powerless, always being told what to do, and how to do it. Without an adult around, they’re running the show!

Play helps children learn about the world in which they live. They can investigate and discover, test their theories, spatial relationships, explore cause and effect, societal roles and family values. Such is the importance of play, that there’s virtually no area of life about which it can’t teach a child something.

 

Play builds self-esteem. Children will often play at something they know they can do well, at which they can be successful.

Play builds social skills. Children will begin playing with inanimate and non-threatening objects, like cuddly toys, bricks etc, so practicing their interactive skills. Later, playing with other children will build on this foundation as they learn to share, take turns, assert themselves and begin to empathize with others.

 

The importance of play with parents shouldn’t be underestimated either, as research shows that children whose parents play with them ultimately develop superior social skills.

Play also provides the opportunity for children to work out their feelings. The importance of play in dealing with difficult or unpleasant emotions is immense. A child who’s worried about going to the dentist, for example, may deal with the anxiety by setting up a clinic for dolls with toothache.

 

Play helps with language development. Think of the vast number of words a toddler uses during play, many of them repeatedly, enhancing their language skills.

Play allows children to grow beyond their years. They can pretend to be all sorts of things in play – a doctor, a surgeon, a civil engineer even !!(think of those bricks)

 

Finally, don’t forget to consider the importance of play in stimulating your child’s creativity and imagination – making a castle in the sand, or a car garage out of a shoe box, taking an order in their own (imaginary) restaurant or dressing up as a king or queen – these all allow children to stretch the limits of their world and experience the fun in make-believe.

Also read: Understanding Music Theory and Its Benefits

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Most parents know that giving a child crayons and a coloring book is great way to occupy a kid for a few hours. What many do not know is what an important role art plays in a child’s development. In recent years a multitude of studies have been made available that link art education to a variety of important aspects of childhood learning. Art education has been linked to increased creativity, development of problem solving skills and better communication skills just to start. The skills that can be developed through art education are skills that last a lifetime and can benefit a child into adulthood regardless of what career path that child may choose. Understanding the importance of art education will allow this often undervalued development tool gain momentum in main stream education programs.

 

The first thing that comes to mind for most people when thinking about the relevance of art is the development of creativity. Helene Goldnadel thinks that creativity is an important skill that can be nurtured though art education for children of all ages. Despite popular belief, creativity is relevant to more than just a child’s artistic ability. A creative child will use that skill in all areas of life from problem solving to communication. All of which is needed in everyday learning situations from math and science to reading. The goal of education is to prepare children for their adult life, creativity and problem solving skills are a valuable asset at all points in a person’s life. Many people tend to think that only artists need to be creative but what about the child who is able to come up with a creative solution to resolve a math or science question. It is the child who can resolve problems through reasoning as oppose to memorization that excels in the school setting. These same skills come in handy later on in life when that child finally enters the workforce.

 

According to Helene Goldnadel communication skills are also a valuable asset when it comes to success in school and then later success in the workforce. Art can be used as a method to help children develop better communication skills. Everyone has seen young children draw pictures of their house and family members. These types of drawings allow a child to express certain ideas that may be difficult to express through language. Having a child talk about the pictures they draw then serves as a tool to help develop those necessary language skills. As a child gets older art can be used to express the complex emotions that develop throughout childhood. Communication skills are vital to success in a school setting and increasing a child’s ability to communicate will enrich a child’s life well into the future.

 

An increase in ability in the areas of problem solving skills, creativity and communication directly translates to better learning in all areas of education. As more people begin to understand the relationship between art and learning hopefully the number of art related programs in schools will increase. There tends to be more focus on learning the skills associated with reading, writing, math and science. Increasing awareness about the role art education plays in developing these skills is a step in the right direction. This will help society create an education program that provides the best learning environment for our children and will in turn create more productive individuals later in life.

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In recent years society has placed a great deal of focus on the value of art and art education. Parents who want to expose their children to art related activities can use this trend to their advantage. The number of places that offer artistic performances and exhibits are growing each year. Community events that focus on the arts are also often geared toward family fun and enjoyment. Many places that were previously considered more adult oriented like museums are beginning to plan events with children in mind. There are also many ways to experience art at little or no cost for those on a budget.

 

Below are some great places Helene Goldnadel suggests for your kids to experience the true form of art:

 

Finding free local concerts that are kid oriented can be as easy as picking up a local news publication. Most newspapers have an entertainment section with listings of all the local concerts and festivals. Some communities even offer free outdoor concerts during the warmer months. Music is a great way to expose children to art and other cultures and festivals can be fun for the whole family. These events sometimes offer more than just music and will feature things like face painting and craft booths. Checking out the local theater is another option for parents looking for art related activities. There are many plays that are enjoyable for children. Going to the theater is a good way for kids to learn about different aspects of art that are outside of the realm of visual arts. A good rule of thumb according to Helene Goldnadel when planning trips to the theater is to take the age of the child into consideration. The theater may not be the best place for a child who has a hard time sitting still or is still too young to understand the theme of a play.

 

Another great place to go is the local museum. Many museums offer exhibits that are child friendly and some have classes and workshops created especially for children. The museum is also a great place for older children to develop art appreciation and learn about the different types of visual art. Many museums also offer discounted entry fees for children and students. Some museums even offer days that have free entry for promotional purposes. Checking the entertainment section of the local newspaper or looking online is great way to find out about promotional events.

 

School is another place where children can learn about the arts. Many schools offer extracurricular art programs for students. More progressive schools may have art classes integrated into the general curriculum. Schools that do not offer art programs will at least have access to information about different youth groups in the area. Check into organizations that promote art related activities for children. There are great deals of youth groups that have very low membership costs.

 

Bringing art into the home can be simple and low cost as well. Setting aside a couple of hours each week for art related projects is a good start. Making collages, playing with sidewalk chalk and coloring are all low cost ways to bring art into the home. Parents with more resources can arrange private art or music lessons for their kids. There are many places a parent can go to bring art into the life of their child. Using the resources available such as the Internet, schools and information in local publications is the first step in this direction.

 

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Music is an important part of life for both children and adults. We use music to relax, to motivate our physical activity, and simply because music is fun and enjoyable. An appreciation of music can increase creativity and the exploration of beats and rhythms provide an understanding of patterns. Music also promotes language skills and a budding appreciation of poetry.

 

Expose your child to a variety of music. Classical music offers clear, repetitive beats that are pleasing to children. There are a number of bands that only perform fun, educational music specifically for children. Introduce your child to the many different genres of modern music before he is old enough to select his personal favorite. Before the age of ten, most children have chosen a favorite style of music and may prefer not to listen to anything else.

 

Music encourages movement and is an important part of large muscle development. Play an assortment of upbeat music and dance with your child. Young children will not only quickly learn to adapt their movement to the beat of the music; they will imitate your dance steps and those they see on television. Dancing is a heart-healthy form of exercise and loads of fun to little ones.

 

Sing with your child on a daily basis. You musical participation will show your child music is important to you and will encourage him to participate as well. Simple children’s songs like “Row, Row, Row Your Boat” or “The Itsy-Bitsy Spider” are easy for children to remember and fun to sing. Singing increases vocabulary and general language knowledge. Don’t limit your singing to children’s songs. Sing along with appropriate music on the radio or CDs as well.

 

Incorporate music into reading time. Read stories about music and look at picture books with different instruments. There are some books that are based on songs and you can sing as you read. Musical games can also open a child’s eyes to the wonders of music. Start a song by humming the first few notes and have your child finish it. Let your child start the song and you can finish it.

 

Encourage young children to make their own music with rattles or a pot and a wooden spoon. Play along with the radio or sing a song as your child plays the beat. As your child gets older, introduce musical toys like shakers, tambourines, and percussion blocks. Preschool children can learn the simple finger notes of a recorder. Playing music helps small muscle development and allows your child to experiment with his personal expression through music.

 

Studies have shown that children, who learn to play an instrument, especially at a young age, perform better in both math and reading than those who have no musical training. Research suggests that music lessons for children as young as 3 and 4 can increase reasoning skills and children who receive at least six years of musical instruction before age 12 have expanded vocabularies and mathematical skills compared to those with less training.

 

Helene Goldnadel observes that piano lessons are preferred by experts over stringed instruments for a child’s first musical experience. Playing the piano provides a child with a better understanding of musical theory and chord progression without the frustration of learning difficult fingering techniques.

 

Immerse your child in music and musical activities every day. Music is a rewarding and enriching part of our lives and is very beneficial to child growth and development.

 

To learn more, please visit here: http://helenegoldnadel.yolasite.com/

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